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Posts Tagged ‘Employers’

Crowning glory: as employers reduce retiree benefits, more seniors are losing their prized dental coverage.: An article from: Best’s Review

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This digital document is an article from Best’s Review, published by Thomson Gale on January 1, 2008. The length of the article is 3052 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

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Title: Crowning glory: as employers reduce r… More >>

Crowning glory: as employers reduce retiree benefits, more seniors are losing their prized dental coverage.: An article from: Best’s Review

Employers urged to brush up on dental cover. : An article from: National Underwriter Property & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management

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This digital document is an article from National Underwriter Property & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management, published by The National Underwriter Company on January 13, 1992. The length of the article is 1374 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

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Employers urged to brush up on dental cover. : An article from: National Underwriter Property & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management

Dental plans can be affordable for employers, employees alike.: An article from: San Diego Business Journal

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This digital document is an article from San Diego Business Journal, published by Thomson Gale on January 29, 2007. The length of the article is 488 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

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Title: Dental plans can be affo… More >>

Dental plans can be affordable for employers, employees alike.: An article from: San Diego Business Journal

Is it Time For Insurance And Employers to Start Partnering With Experienced Facilitator?

As companies seek to reduce their operating budgets, one of the places they can often find ways to cut costs is by reducing their employee healthcare spending. Unfortunately, reducing or cutting healthcare benefits packages can cause significant reductions in employee morale. How can companies reduce their healthcare spending while at the same time ensuring that their employees do not feel like their benefits package has decreased in value? Some employers and insurance companies are looking to the example set by private “medical tourists” for inspiration.

For years, “medical tourism” has been a term which brings to mind affordable plastic surgery and weight loss surgery abroad, more often than not resulting in negative consequences due to poor medical tourism aftercare. But these outdated stereotypes of the field are now giving way to a much more positive reputation, as companies and individuals find that they can actually put technologies like video conferencing and VoIP to use, benefiting both individuals who receive top-notch care, and the companies who are footing the bill for their treatments.

This is exciting news, because it’s at this stage that the real benefit of using medical tourism facilitators to find health professionals in foreign countries becomes evident. The best medical tourism companies are accessing this under-developed market by helping assemble interdisciplinary teams of medical professionals in far-flung locations where costs are more controlled. Patients and employers who once balked at the idea of receiving their medical treatment far from home feel more at ease once they have had extended conversations with their treatment teams, thus allowing insurance companies and employers to realize greater bottom-line savings.

What’s more, because any top 10 medical tourism company already has the connections and experience that will allow them to single out the best providers of health care at the lowest rates possible, an individual employer or insurance company does not have to invest time and money into building a healthcare network abroad. Instead, they can take advantage of the knowledge medical tourism companies have already gained.

As a result, employees and their dependents can obtain access to either higher-quality care at equal cost to their employers, or equivalent-quality care at lower costs. Companies that have previously only offered medical coverage may find that they are able to add low cost dental procedures and dental surgery abroad, thereby increasing the value of their employees’ compensation packages and actually improving morale!

Ultimately, medical tourism is a reality of today’s global healthcare world, and both employers and insurance companies can utilize the skills of the best medical tourism facilitators to provide excellent care at the lowest prices for their employees. In short, the time has indeed come for insurance companies and employers to start partnering with experienced medical tourism facilitators.

About Author
The author has international expertise in the healthcare industry, telehealth and business administration. His diverse set of skills will deliver exceptional healthcare support services while maintaining a strong balance sheet.

Health Insurance From The Employer’s Point of View

There has been a sad trend since the turn of this century. Health insurance costs have been rising so fast that even large sections of the middle class now find it a struggle, if not impossible, to pay the premiums demanded by the insurers for private plans. The fact is that, although in the last one or two years, there have been some increases in average take-home pay, these increases have not kept pace with inflation. People today are more poor than they were ten years ago. For a time, people compensated by using their credit cards and borrowing against the positive housing equity on their homes. With the bursting of the housing bubble and the credit crunch, people must now confront the size of the debt they carry. Articles like this are not supposed to feel sorry for employers. They are the ones who take our work, pay us as little possible and buy big houses to live in. Sometimes, we only put up with this exploitation because of the health plans some offer as part of the compensation package. But they have also been feeling the strain. The national statistics show that, in the period 2000-2007, there was an average 80% increase in the premiums payable by employers for the health plan offered to their employees. As a cost, this has increased five times faster than the cost of wages and salaries. Because consumers have come to expect that prices will not rise, it has not been possible to pass these increased costs on in the wholesale and retail prices. The result has been a reduction in the profits earned by the employers. Hence, wages have not risen fast enough to keep pace with inflation.

This has real significance for the future health of the nation. Slightly more than 30% of the workforce is less than 30 years old and the majority of them are not insured. This because more employers have given up the unequal struggle to keep up a health plan for new employees, and more younger people who still have their health do not see it as a priority to use more and more of their take-home pay to fund private health insurance. They feel they are paying against the risk of sickness that might never come. This has an unfortunate knock-on effect. Health insurance distributes the risk so that the fit and health subsidize those who fall sick. If too many of the healthy refuse cover, the cost must be born by the older population more likely to make claims. This forces the premiums to rise. It would be better if everyone had a policy because this spreads the costs and keeps everyone’s payments low. You can make a start by using sites like this to find the cheapest possible policy, but nothing will change unless government policy changes.

About Author
Want to see what Marcus Stalder has to say on other topics? With years of experience Marcus Stalder is a constant writer for http://www.healthinsurance-guidance.com/health-insurance-tips/health-insurance-from-the-employers-point-of-view.html and you can see all his contributions on that site.

Employers urged to brush up on dental cover. : An article from: National Underwriter Property & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management

Product Description
This digital document is an article from National Underwriter Property & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management, published by The National Underwriter Company on January 13, 1992. The length of the article is 1374 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Detail… More >>

Employers urged to brush up on dental cover. : An article from: National Underwriter Property & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management

South Florida Employers Sound Off on Healthcare Reform

As President Barack Obama pushes Congress to pass a healthcare reform package in the next two weeks, South Florida employers have two main messages to the nation’s top policymakers: Reduce costs and don’t mess up small businesses.

Some Congressional leaders say Obama’s timetable won’t be met, but much of the nation is watching carefully. Doctors, hospitals and pharmaceutical companies all have huge stakes in the outcome, as do the estimated 50 million uninsured.

But so does a group that has been fairly quiet until now — the nation’s employers.

“There’s change that’s needed, but there are moving parts that need to be examined,” said Publix spokeswoman Maria Brous. “We want to make sure we are doing things that are well thought-out.”
Publix and many other companies say that whatever is done to extend coverage to the uninsured, the government needs to cut healthcare costs.

“Get the costs down!” pleads Marlene Bernard, co-owner of Apricot Office Supplies in Miami Gardens. She recently paid $300 out of pocket for lab tests. “Who can keep affording this?”
Larger employers are generally able to continue to provide quality health plans even in a recession, and the bills aren’t likely to affect them, but for small employers, it’s another story. Many can’t afford to pay for insurance now, and they fear the consequences of some proposals, such as the one that would add an 8 percent payroll tax to companies with payrolls of more than $250,000 a year that don’t provide insurance.

“Oh my Lord! We couldn’t survive,” said Miriam Vilariño when she heard that proposal. Her family owns 14 restaurants, most called Las Vegas Cuban, in Broward and Miami-Dade counties. “The only thing we could do is hike our prices and our customers are already suffering to the max. We are a very budget-priced family enterprise.”

A study this month by the U.S. Public Interest Research Groups found that 76 percent of small businesses surveyed said their interests are not being recognized in the healthcare debate.
The study reported: “Small businesses who do not currently offer coverage would overwhelmingly like to, but are stymied by high costs, complications and red tape.”

Some proposals would provide tax credits to employers of fewer than 25 full-time workers (House of Representatives) or 50 (Senate) to help them buy insurance, but that wouldn’t help Las Vegas Cuban, which has more than 250 low-paid employees.

Steven Ullmann, who directs health policy programs at the University of Miami, said the details about how to reward or punish small businesses are still being hammered out in the halls of Congress.
A critical issue is what happens to those businesses on the edge of any new healthcare law, said Ullmann. If a firm’s payroll or number of employees meant it might required to provide insurance or be taxed, the easy solution would be to lay off people to get below the threshold. “The consequences of these things can get complicated,” said Ullmann.

One example: The payroll tax proposal was intended to encourage companies to provide insurance, but the co-owners of Apricot Office Supplies found themselves wondering if the tax wouldn’t be cheaper than offering employees insurance — the opposite of what policymakers had planned.
For a small-business owner like Vincent T. Brown of Grace Funeral Home in Miami, the view can be simpler.

Brown offers health insurance to his four employees, paying 70 percent of the premium, because “it’s the right thing to do.”

But he knows that there are many self-employed or small-firm workers who have no insurance, and a major illness could be catastrophic for them. “It’s critical this country find a way to protect them.”
What follows are snapshots of a survey of South Florida employers’ healthcare situation and their views about what Washington should be doing to improve the situation.

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